Most Venomous Spider

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    The redback spider consistently ranks among the top 10 most venomous spiders in the world.

    This scary, dangerous spider is one of the deadliest spiders on the planet.

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    Their bite has required far more antivenom treatments than any other creature in Australia.

    It’s the red back spider, and here’s what you need to know to survive.

    What is it?
    The Red back spider, or Lactrodectus hasseltii, is a tiny venomous arachnid arthropod normally measuring about 1 cm long.

    But despite its small size, it carries a neurotoxin that can kill you with just one bite.

    Redback spiders are characterized by their black bodies with a burst of red stripe on their back.

    Although they’re generally not aggressive, they’re one of the few spider species that’s considered seriously harmful towards humans.

    Where is it located?
    Redback spiders are native to Australia.

    They’re more active at night, and during the day are known to hide in dark places close to human residences such as garden sheds, mailboxes, and even under toilet seats.

    Although they prefer warmer climates, they’re tolerant to cold environments too, making them an all-around threat to those living around them.

    How it will kill you?
    A redback spider’s deadly neurotoxic venom contains close to 1,200 different amino acids that’ll cause your body to shut down once it’s in your system.

    The initial pain sets in about five to ten minutes after the bite, then increases significantly as times passes.

    This can persist for up to 30 days! At the same time, it’ll cause negative effects on your nervous system with symptoms that include muscle spasms, body pains, vomiting, headache, and agitation.

    Death ultimately results due to pulmonary edema or respiratory failure.

    How to survive?
    Unlike most venomous bites, pressure immobilization of the wound is NOT recommended for a redback spider bite, although keeping the victim completely still to keep the venom from spreading is beneficial and highly advised.

    Depending on the severity of the poisoning, most bites don’t require medical care.

    But more severe cases will require an antivenom to be treated.

    Since the introduction of this antivenom in 1956, there have been no deaths from redback bites, thanks to how effective it is.

    Now what do you think is worse, and why? Being burned with liquid nitrogen? Or being bit by a fire ant?

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